Land Scores

A series of graphic scores made in the landscape. Each score is made by visualising the sounds of the landscape through automatic abstract mark making. 

Wooden Hut

I take inspiration from music notation with the concept of the score running throughout my work. The circular structure allows me to place myself at the centre of the scores and map out the sounds around me.

My drawing process starts by placing myself in the landscape, where I use a process of automatic mark making to record what I hear. Different environments require different forms of mark making; natural landscapes need more organic marks compared to that of more urban landscapes where marks tend to me more structured and rigid. By working with sound and as my subject, I bypass the limitations of vision and don’t require visual access to an object. I use hearing as a form of remote sensing to draw. I want people to engage with the musicality of my drawings, to image how they may sound and experience the total immersion I feel when making my work in the landscape.

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Recording my process

To give a little insight into how I visually respond to sounds, I’ve started recording myself working outside in the landscape. Starting with a blank score, I start automatically notating the sounds I hear through a variety of mark making forms.

These videos aren’t intended to be presented as final pieces but as process work. They contextualise my drawings by offering insight into how they respond to an environment.

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Fox Rosehill Land Score
 

When working on a large enough score, I will stand in the centre with my brush, twisting and turning to map the locations of the sounds I hear. Compared to the smaller Land Scores which only take around 1 minute each, this large score took up to 2 hours to complete. Even then there is no real ‘complete’ point of these drawings. They could go on forever, mapping out sounds till the entirety of the paper is marked.

I’m starting to consider what I want to role of these photos to be. Like the video work, these aren’t meant to replace the drawings, to serve as the final outcome. Instead these photos are there to record my process to give some context the the final drawings. I am however, reconsidering what I want the relationship to be between the large scores and their process photography.

With my smaller scores, I am happy for the title to be enough to describe what the score visualises, however with thee large scores I think the photos could make the drawings more impressive when being presented. Does presenting the drawing by itself only tell half of the story?